Washington-Franklin stamp sorting...

Discussion in 'United States Stamps' started by ratio411, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. ratio411

    ratio411 Active Member

    Well, I have several hundred Washington-Franklin stamps sorted out of the hoard I am working on.

    I took the bulk, which are 1c and 2c varieties, and broke them down into 2 piles:

    Stamps that read "2 CENTS 2" at the bottom, and those that read "TWO CENTS" in the same position.
    (same with the "ONE CENTS")

    I guess the easy part is now done.

    What are your suggestions for proceeding?
    Remember we are talking many hundreds of 2c stamps...

    Do I break them down into rotary and flat first, or should I break them down into perfs first?

    I know eventually everything: perfs, watermarks, rotary/flat, etc... will need doing to reach catalog IDs, but which one item would you go to first?

    I am thinking I want to break them down as a group, one identifying factor at a time, rather than picking up one stamp and going through every factor before picking up the next. Am I thinking clearly?
    View attachment 529
     
  2. ratio411

    ratio411 Active Member

    Be gentle on me! ;)

    I am a relative newbie, and this is the first I have gotten the nerve up to tackle this series of stamps.
     
  3. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    Alvin likes this.
  4. ratio411

    ratio411 Active Member

    Very nice. I think I'm going to print that off.

    I added some of this series to 'ratio411's trade material' thread.
    I found that I have an extra 517 (50c) and 518 ($1).
    I haven't looked them up yet, but I figure the high face value makes them a bit desireable to fill holes. ???
    Also have duplicates in others, but lack knowing the exact SC# yet.
     
  5. ratio411

    ratio411 Active Member

    I am severely lacking 'coils'...
    I have hundreds, maybe even thousands of this series, and I went through them today and found 1 coil stamp. :(
     
  6. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    I too am just delving into this series. It's quite challenging but rewarding when you correctly Identify your stamp! I believe this is very good reference from the Scott catalog. Thank you for posting this.
     
  7. ratio411

    ratio411 Active Member

    For 2 hours yesterday I was bouncing off the walls because I thought I had found a 482a.

    It had everything right...
    It was collected in the 1950s in Pittsburgh, all 482a stamps were released in Pittsburgh.
    It was imperf with Schermacks... Every 482a was sent to one business, and every stamp was Schermacked.
    It was an unusually strong T1, making it appear as T1a.

    I finally got a way to check watermark... It was there. :(
    Turned out to be a 409 with Schermacks.
    For 2 hours though, I had a 482a!
     
  8. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    lol, have done that many of times, thinking you have something rare and high value. We can all dream. lol :D
     
  9. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    I too am guilty of that! lol Oh well..better luck next time I guess.
     
  10. ratio411

    ratio411 Active Member

  11. ratio411

    ratio411 Active Member

    View attachment 593

    The stamp in question.
    If it had been authentic, it would have been with 40 known survivors, all of which are used but one.
    Considering the pictures I have seen of those stamps, it would have been far better centered.
    Most are horribly offset to one side or other.

    Alas though, you are looking at a 409.
     
  12. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Hey ratio411 I sorted out a few of mine yesterday and I found it absolutely imperative to use a watermark detector and, of course, a perf gauge. I didn't have (and still don't) own a watermark detecting apparatus so I fashioned one from some zippo fluid and the black space on my perforation gauge. Seemed to do the trick rather nicely. Hope this helps some.
     
  13. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    Hey Jay, I also use lighter fluid and a black plastic lid from a coffee container. That works great. Even if you have a mint stamp with glue, the lighter fluid doesnt affect it at all. Within minutes the fluid evaporates and the stamp is fine. I leave the stamps out for awhile, so that they can air out, and get rid of the lighter fluid smell.
     
  14. swish513

    swish513 Active Member

    good info to know!! i never would have even thought to try that. i guess my mind is still in "coin collector" mode and am afraid to touch my stamps with any substance.
     
  15. steve logan

    steve logan Logie Bear

    i spent £75 on a watermark detector from stanley gibbons, a few years ago, and to be honest it is not very good at all, just another waste of money, when as you say lighter fuel and my perf guage background works 10x better.

    so to all new collectors, just because it is expensive does not mean it is the best method?
     
    kacyds likes this.
  16. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    Thanks for the info, Steve. I always wondered if those watermark detectors were any good. :confused:
     
  17. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    Dont let them get to you. lol
    I have most of them, and enjoy every minute of looking for the few I dont have. Any questions, Please let me know. I be more than happy to help.
     
  18. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Exactly correct! That is the most intimidating set for me. I only have about 8 of them and looking forward to getting more.
     
  19. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Hey is that an open offer? I may need your help in the near future with these if that's OK?
     
  20. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    That would be great, even if you need to ship them to me, and I identify them, I have no problems with that. I love the Washington/Franklin series.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted
Similar Threads: Washington-Franklin stamp
Forum Title Date
United States Stamps Early U. S Revenue Documents/ Stamps Dec 13, 2020
United States Stamps Rewriting Stamp History Oct 21, 2020
United States Stamps USA stamp for sell and exchange Apr 9, 2020
United States Stamps Washington red 2c stamp Feb 24, 2020
United States Stamps Famous stamp researchers covers Award winners! Feb 18, 2020

Share This Page