Postal Stationery

Discussion in 'Want Lists' started by Werner Salentin, Oct 4, 2016.

  1. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    P266.jpg
    Winterhilfswerk 1937
     
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  2. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Upon seeing the drawing on the right side of this card my first thought was 'rough seas and seasick sailors!':vomit: Either that or 'man overboard!' Actually, it looks like they are pulling in nets.

    Don
     
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  3. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    P268.jpg
    issued 1937 to commemorate the "Anschluß",the unification with
    Austria.(illustrated backside to follow)
     
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  4. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    P268R.jpg
    backside of the previous card
     
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  5. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    P272.jpg
    NSDAP party convent in Nuremberg 1938
     
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  6. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    P274.jpg
    Winterhilfswerk 1938
    Exists with six different illustrations for different winter-months.
     
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  7. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    P275.jpg
    Annexation of the "Sudeten-Land" (the parts of Czechoslovakia,
    inhabited by Germans) 1938.Card was sold for 15 Pfennig.
     
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  8. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    The back-side of the previous card:
    P275R.jpg
     
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  9. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    P276.jpg
    Cologne carnival,issued 1938 (green),1939 (brown).
     
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  10. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    P276R.jpg
    backside of both previous cards
     
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  11. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    P291.jpg
    Winterhilfswerk 1940
     
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  12. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Werner:

    Interesting cachet on this card. Who did Winter Help help and what was provided, money, food, shelter, clothing and who distributed it?

    Thanks.

    Don
     
  13. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    The Winterhilfswerk was a organisation of gigantic size.
    They,usually 1.2 to 1.5 Millions of volunteers,collected money
    and goods (mainly clothing) for the poor and later the soldiers
    on the Eastern Front.
    It existed before 1933,but was organized in a grand scale from
    then on.
    It was supervised by the "Ministerium für Propaganda und Volks-
    aufklärung",headed by Joseph Goebbels.
    Money came from two main-sources:
    a) donations by companies and institutions and b) from a tax of 10 % of the income taxes.
    Smaller amounts came from street collections mostly done by school-children.At the beginning of each yearly collection campaign top Nazi-greats were in the streets with collecting-boxes,as shown on the postcard.
    A tiny amount,around a tenth of a percent was from the sale of
    stamps and postcards.
    In 1942/43 the total budget of the WHW was about 1.2 billions
    Reichsmark,in todays money ca. US $ 7 billions.
     
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  14. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Back in the 1970s & 1980s, the U.S. issued a short series of postal cards depicting aircraft and/or flights. Here is the first, the ubiquitous Curtiss JN "Jenny."

    Don
    aaa.jpg
     
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  15. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    A second offering of the aircraft on postal cards. This one commemorating the Oct 4-5, 1931 first trans-Pacific flight of Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon, Jr. The duo had originally set out to set a new round the world flight in record time, but literally got bogged down on a muddy runway in Siberia. Realizing they could not beat the existing record, they set out to be the first to fly across the Pacific from Japan to the U.S. Misadventure with Japanese authorities and a controlled crash landing in Wenatchee Washington, make the the story of this flight one of the more interesting in U.S. aviation history. The crash landing was due to Pangborn's decision to modify the aircraft by dropping its landing gear once airborne from Japan in order to reduce drag and save fuel. The decision to land at Wenatchee was due to solid overcasts at Seattle, Boise, Idaho, and Spokane. Here's a photo of their airplane, Miss Veedol at Wenatchee:

    [​IMG]

    And the card:
    aaa.jpg
     
  16. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    P298.jpg
    The last of my postcards of the III.Reich:local card,issued 1941.
     
  17. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Here is the next postal card in the aircraft on covers sequence. It is Sc. UXC20 depicting gliders in flight. This card has been buried in the shoe box collection. I just found it again, but don't have it written up and I have not yet identified the glider manufacturer or model. Maybe with this posting I can get it moved up on the things to do list.

    Don

    aaa5.jpg
     
  18. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Continuing this series of airmail postal cards showing aircraft is Sc. UXC22, a card depicting a Martin M 130, "China Clipper." This airplane, also depicted on U.S. airmail stamps, Sc. C20, & C21-22, opened the trans-Pacific areas to air travel and also produced a plethora of airmail philatelic covers for folks like us. The 130 could carry up to 48 passengers depending upon route and seating configurations. One variation included 18 sleeping compartments for overnight travel. The airplane cruised at 163 mph and had a range of 3,000 miles. It was this dramatically extended range that allowed trans-oceanic air travel. According to Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation only three 130s were built, all for Pan American Airways.

    Don

    aaa.jpg
     
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  19. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Below is Sc. UXC24, the next in this airmail postal card series depicting aircraft. This one is the ubiquitous Douglas DC-3. The DC-3 made air passenger service profitable for the airlines. It was a low operating cost aircraft that allowed the airlines to fly in some marginal weather, included capacity for freight and mail, offered good speed for the time period, and reasonable comfort for passengers. While I don't know the numbers, I cannot imagine that the DC-3 did not improve Douglas's profitability too. It is another iconic U.S. aircraft out of the 1930s.

    Don

    aaa2.jpg
     
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