my centennial 1876 exposition ticket

Discussion in 'United States Stamps' started by Jay, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. Tom D

    Tom D Well-Known Member

    Nice Jay
     
    Jay likes this.
  2. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Tom D likes this.
  3. Tom D

    Tom D Well-Known Member

    Find looking stamps and good work.
     
    Jay likes this.
  4. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    I love these tickets because it brings the corresponding stamp sets/series more to life. I started a tangent because of that very reason and will eventually have all the tickets, stamps and ephemera, paraphernalia mounted and framed- all archival materials of course! ....or maybe a high-end stock book or a leather-bound slipcase & binder and a vario set-up? Something to think about for me I suppose!
     
  5. Steve Robinson

    Steve Robinson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Then you will have to start on the postcards of the events :)
     
  6. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    Get out the checkbook......lol Looks great!!!!
     
  7. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Thanx! I like em too. If was easy and inexpensive it wouldn't be worth doing-properly.
     
  8. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Definitely. I will get a few select ones with the adorning Columbian stamps. I am doing all the tickets and the attendees program guide and a period map of the expositions layout. I have some of it already.
     
  9. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    I just picked this up on a whim a few moments ago..

    [​IMG]
     
    Tom D likes this.
  10. Tom D

    Tom D Well-Known Member

    How many are left Jay?
     
  11. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    at least 2. I've never seen a whole one so unsure. They are not really expensive; they range from $5.00 and up.

    There is actually another one I want but the one they had of it was creased so I passed on it. It was an exhibit called the Hydrosphere. It pictured an aircraft hooked up to a large "float" that was on a body of water. Hard to explain really but it was fascinating to say the least! But I did manage to get this one from the Palace of Fine Arts and it looks to be from a booklet. I thought it interesting and it is in great condition.
     
  12. Tom D

    Tom D Well-Known Member

    I hope you could get another one. Would it sometimes be wise to have gotten it then sell it when you get a better one? Or am I just free with your money to be buy things?:rolleyes:
     
  13. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    haha I buy the ones in my "price designation/range" that are in the best possible condition. no use in selling as you'd probably lose your shirt doing so. It would cost you to list it, fees' if someone did buy it and you would never get out of it what you put into it so "do it right the first time" I always say.
     
  14. Tom D

    Tom D Well-Known Member

    Point taken.
     
  15. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Now do understand that I wasn't "hollering" at you or anything of the sort but the fact remains that something is only valued what someone is willing to buy it for and what the seller is willing to sell it for so having stated that I might be willing to pay $50.00 for an item that you wouldn't give a wooden nickle for so- in the immortal words of Einstein "It's all relative"...lol

    You know I see these pawn shows on the television and it never ceases to completely amaze me how people time and time again end up with something old (say from the 1800's) and think that they are sitting on a fortune! Unfortunately for most of them they just have just that- an old item. There also is a humongous difference between Rare and Valuable.~ Say you have an object that is both old and rare- if it isn't A: a collectable or B: in super-fine or excellent condition then it is pretty much worth nothing -to him however, if someone collects that type of thing then you may have a shot at selling it, but only if the person is interested (of course) and the price is right (again, of course). So Rare, Old, condition most often does not equal valuable.

    I got to add this too while I'm on my soapbox - [​IMG] The words spoken so many times I don't care to count them is "but it's one-of-a-kind"! To me that means JUNK. If it is in-fact a one-of-a-kind then there in no market or collectability for the simple fact that there is NO SOLID BASE to formulate a price. Bad choice of words if you are attempting to sell something.
     
  16. Tom D

    Tom D Well-Known Member

    No jay I took no offense to your words. But you are so right;
    1) there is what it is worth (BOOK)
    2) what they want to sell it for
    3) what I want to pay for it

    And all can be so different in price value.
    Value, what we put to it is so personel, "One mans junk is another's treasure".
     
  17. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Right! Also I'll add an addendum here: Sometimes one mans junk is just another mans...junk. lol

    Even the Scott's catalog is just a guide to evaluation and nothing in it is set in stone. 5 dollars, 500 dollars. Condition and centering is paramount.
     
  18. Tom D

    Tom D Well-Known Member

    also one could say this, why use mounts vs hinges. I like mounts even if what is in the mount will never be as valuable as the mount. But to me it is ok it all does say the same thing. None of it is wrong, I put my own value to it. It is all good though.
     
  19. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    I'll use a mount but never a hinge. That's just the way I roll...lol
     
  20. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member


    I wanted to share these with this post but it escaped me until I re-read this post this morning.​
    ~Here you go.~​
    The Columbian Exposition's 50¢ pieces. 1892 & 1893. (U.S. mint)​

    Obverse:
    [​IMG]

    Reverse:
    [​IMG]
     
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