MOLOKAI’S BLOG

Discussion in 'Stamp Chat' started by Molokai, Mar 6, 2018.

  1. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    Oh my gosh! Who had the patience to note all of those variations, and that is for 1936 only!

    Christmas seal collecting used to be more popular, obviously. The practice of increasing the design to 50+ per year probably killed the golden goose for this field. Elmer Long, a long-standing dealer in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, used to advertise Christmas seals, and the cover below suggests to me that one could make a living selling them.

    Don

    aaa.jpg
     
    Molokai likes this.
  2. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    My first serious interests in stamps, circa 14-years old, were the Blackjack issue and the large Banknotes. It was about that time I ditched school for a day to read Nassau Street by Herman Herst for the first time. (Later, I ditched several days to read David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature – but that’s another story.)

    The banknotes fascinated me because of the mysterious ‘secret marks’ which were placed on the stamps when the printing contract switched from National Banknote to Continental Banknote. (The marks were applied by National.) But the higher denominations did not have a secret mark (24c, 30c, 90c – and there is debate as to the 15c). Thus, identifying a Continental presented some problems. The 24-cent Winfield Scott issue I found particularly attractive – and the lack of a secret mark particularly curious. Like many before me, I was sure there must be a secret mark; it just hadn’t been found. Surely something that I could do! Over the next several years I accumulated 200 or more 24-cent Scotts in said quest.

    Once, I purchased an ‘unused’ copy (almost all of mine were used) and found a very distinct thickness in old Winfield’s hair. Looking a little more, I found yet another distinct thickness. “Eureka, Ich habe es gefunden!” as <Werner> might say. Ha, Ha. Soon I found several more such thicknesses and realized I had a used stamp with most of the cancel removed!

    Without a secret mark, how can the National be distinguished from the Continental? That is the question.

    Here are the printings of the 24-cent Winfield Scott:

    142 – National Bank Note (‘H’ grill)

    153 – National Bank Note (ungrilled)

    164 – Continental Bank Note (vertically ribbed paper)

    175 – Continental Bank Note (special printing)

    200 – American Bank Note (special printing)

    Collectors have also tried to parse out the Continentals by colour. Unfortunately, the colour purple and the quite fugitive ink used is quite susceptible to faded and no success has been recorded in that endeavour.

    As it turns out, Continental used a ribbed paper on occasion. It has been determined National never used such paper, so a banknote of that period must necessarily be a Continental if the paper is ribbed. Only a single Scott #164 has been certified. A Continental 24-cent Winfield Scott on ribbed paper. The new question is (and I am happy to hear theories) why has only one copy been found? The late-great Bill Weiss said he had examined thousands of 24-cent Winfield Scotts in search of another example of a Continental ribbed paper, #164.

    For quite some time, there was a question as to whether Continental even printed and distributed a regular issue, 24-cent Scott. This from Lester Brookman in The Bank Note Issues of the United States, 1870-1893:

    For the past 40 years or more collectors have been cussing and discussing the stamp listed as #164. It is known that 365,000 Continental 24 cent stamps were actually printed and turned over to the stamp agent sometime in the period between January 1 and June 30, 1875. These were printed on the Nation plate #21 which was not, so far as anyone knows, altered in any manner from the state in which it was received from and previously used by the National Bank Note Company.

    And

    It is not known whether any of the 365000 Continentals were ever issued to any post offices as no 24 cent stamps were issued to post offices after June 30, 1875. It is known that in 1885 the remainders of the 24 cent stamp were destroyed. The total number of these remainders was 364,950 stamps which were 50 less than the number of stamps printed by Continental. It does not necessarily follow that all of these remainders were 24 cent Continentals.

    A final proof of a Continental 24-cent was offered by William Mooz in 1999.

    Other quotes on the Lost Continental:

    Sloane’s Column page 253

    I had access to the late John N. Luff’s Reference Collection. I noted that Mr Luff had at some time attempted to work out something from the shades of the plate proofs, of which there are half a dozen or more, but it seemed apparent to me that eventually, he gave it up as a bad job.

    And

    A die proof of the Continental work can be obtained showing the secret mark, wherein the rays of the lower right star were deepened, but no plate with this secret marking was made…”


    Washington Post, December 24, 1999

    An American stamp so rare no copy is known to exist has sold for $397,838 in an online auction.

    The 24-cent stamp is known as Scott No. 164 or the "Lost Continental" and was found by a California man, Eraldo Magazzu of Poway, who purchased 12 boxes of unsorted stamps for $4,800 in 1967.


    The certified copy sold again at the 2004 Siegel Auction 888 (Lake Shore Collection, Lot #130) for $325,000. If it has sold since I do not know.

    Given the calculations of the possible numbers, I note this stamp is used. Can the cancellation tell us anything?


    If you wish to dig deeper – I warn you it gets complicated – Google ‘Winfield Scott stamp 164’ and/or Lost ‘Continental stamp.’ A good place to start is here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_Continental

    Or here:

    https://siegelauctions.com/lots.php?sale_no=888&lot_no=130

    LostContinental.jpg
    The Lost Continental from Siegel Auction 888, Lot #130.
     
    Werner Salentin and DonSellos like this.
  3. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    An interesting commentary, Molokai. Nineteenth-century U.S. stamps have been too pricey for me to persue, but they do have their interesting items. Not many stamps have a separate Scott number with only one example known.

    Don
     
  4. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member


    I did not know this. I always thought Perfin was an abbreviation for perforated initials.

    Don
     
    Molokai likes this.
  5. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    The stamp dealer I traded most with locally was big on Christmas Seals. I remember seeing at least part of his collection at his store, The Penny Black. Lordy knows how many we threw away in the 1950s and 1960s... Yes, fly-specking heaven for sure.:joyful:

    Thanks for sharing the neat cover <Don>.
     
  6. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    I read it in the Encyclopedia of United States Stamps and Stamp Collecting (USSS, 2006, 730pp) which, BTW, is a decent read/reference that can be had for a song.

    Also - "Perfins" is an acronym for PERForated INSignias" Louis Repeta, U.S. Stamp News in a multi-part excellent intro to perfins.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2018
    DonSellos likes this.
  7. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    That would be an interesting project - Scott #s for only-known stamps. Let's put <Hoch> right on it.:joyful:
     
  8. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    "Thank God We're Surrounded By Water" - The Postage Stamps of Newfoundland (Biblio)

    I loved the friendly folks up in Newfoundland! I was there twice, working for the St.John's BOT implementing a BBS setup for the schools of the province. Later they made big of the fact that they were the first Canadian province to have Internet in all their schools. Perhaps I helped push them in that direction.

    At the time I was there, the Burin fisheries had been closed as the waters were all fished out and needed some years to replenish cod stocks. Sad to go to the local grocery store and see cod imported from Iceland. Unemployment was over 20% and a lot of folks spent time at the local pub drinking the local rum, Screech. I did find Newfie lobster even better than Maine's.

    When I was there, Joey Smallwood had just passed away; he was the first premier of Newfoundland after it voted to join Canada. He fought hard for the vote to join. Some folks adored him; quite a few, not-so-much. But it didn't stop them from cashing their unemployment checks from Ottawa...

    I won some money in a raffle at a strip bar, went back to our cottage and happily told my wife. Forget the money, "What were you doing in a strip bar?!?"

    The weather can be difficult up there. Every time the sun came out (not too often) the wind blew. I remember walking on Water Street in St. John's on Canada Day (1 July) and seeing it snow.

    Fun note: There are two small islands off the Burin peninsula owned by France. A short ferry ride takes you to totally French culture.

    Anyways, here is my list of books on Newfoundland philately. As always, corrections or additions much appreciated! I've also included a few Newfoundland auction catalogues I've found along the way; surely there are more as Newfoundland has been a popular country for stamp collectors.
    ---------------------
    AAMC – The Air Mails of Canada and Newfoundland

    Ayshford – The Last Stamps of Newfoundland

    Boggs – The Postage Stamps and Postal History of Newfoundland

    Brown – Newfoundland Postage Stamp Designs

    Brown – Simplified Guide to Newfoundland Postage Stamps

    Butler – Catalogue of Newfoundland Stamps for 1928

    Dalwick – Newfoundland Air Mails 1919-1939

    Dickinson – First Day Covers of Newfoundland

    Dodd – The New-found Land – A Postal History

    Gibbons – Sidney Harris Collection Newfoundland (Auction Catalog)

    Goodkind – The Hawker Stamp of Newfoundland

    Harmer – Newfoundland Airmails 1919-1949

    Harmers – Dr Matejka Newfoundland Aero-Philately (Auction Catalogs, 2 Volumes)

    Harmers – The Labrador Newfoundland Airmails (Auction Catalogue

    Harrison – Newfoundland Postal Stationary 1873-1941: An Exhibit

    Kershaw – The Lithographed One-Cent Stamp of Newfoundland (2 Volumes)

    Konwiser/Campbell – The Canada and Newfoundland Stampless Cover Catalog

    Lewis – Newfoundland and Postal History 1857-1899: An Exhibit

    McKearin – Reference List of the Stamps of Newfoundland

    Motson – Newfoundland Airmail Stamps and Air Mail Flights 1918-1949

    Poole – Postage Stamps of Newfoundland

    Pratt – The Pence Issues of Newfoundland 1857-1866

    Robson/Lowe – IV Newfoundland, B.C.

    Stalker – Travelling Post Office Postmarks of Newfoundland & Labrador

    Smythies – BNA Fakes and Forgeries

    Stanbury – Newfoundland Stamps: A Philatelic Outline

    Walsh – 2018 Newfoundland Specialized Stamp Catalogue

    Webb – Postal Stationery Catalogue Canada and Newfoundland

    I would be remiss not to mention the BNAPS, the British North American Philatelic Society www.bnaps.org with a Newfoundland group and a decent newsletter, The Newfie News.

    Here is an interesting Newfoundland block:

    newfiecinderella.jpg

    This was privately produced in Minnesota with the printing contract approved by the Newfoundland government in 1932. But the issue was cancelled and not officially issued. Is it a Cinderella if it was approved by the government?
     
    DonSellos likes this.
  9. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    If I had a copy and were adding it to my Aircraft on Stamps collection, I would label it a cinderella.

    Don
     
    Werner Salentin and Molokai like this.
  10. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    Two stamp show souvenir sheets featuring newspaper & periodical stamps. A little variety for my N & P collection.


    StampShowNP2.PNG

    StampShowNP1.PNG
     
    DonSellos likes this.
  11. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    Very attractive souvenir sheets! I don't remember ever seeing Newspaper and Periodicals stamps on a souvenir sheet.

    Don
     
  12. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    I've not seen any others, either. Perhaps those exhibitions featured N & P collections? Let's put <HOCH> at work on that question right away!:happy:
     
  13. H. G. Golightly

    H. G. Golightly Active Member

    Hello Group,
    I, as well, have been really disappointed w/ the articles in Linn's. For the most part they are as dry as desert sand, lacking information that would be of interest to a wider group of collectors, & having many articles so arcane they are of complete dis-interest...to me at least. I do have to mention one very interesting piece that showed up several months ago concerning different 'Treasure Finds' of good to great stamp deals at Flea Mkts.,
    Junk & Antique Stores, etc. I personally enjoy hearing about other collectors finding great deals in unlikely places. Who amongst us doesn't enjoy a good Treasure Story?
    HG
     
    DonSellos and Molokai like this.
  14. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    Howdy <Golightly> I've done a few sweet deals and had some excellent buys in my day, but not really a bona fided treasure find. But its a lot of fun just looking and hoping! I did find a few common plate blocks between the pages of a stamp book I purchased so of course I always look when I buy a book now!

    I am reminded Herman Herst's career was really kick-started when he found a 30c pictorial invert at an antique store. If memory serves, it allowed him to travel to Europe and pick up some excellent material at very low prices.
     
    H. G. Golightly likes this.
  15. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    [QUOTE I personally enjoy hearing about other collectors finding great deals in unlikely places. Who amongst us doesn't enjoy a good Treasure Story?][/QUOTE]

    HG:

    Yes, it is always entertaining to read of great finds, stamps, coins, art works, etc. They always leave me hopeful that, maybe, someday, I might make a great find too. For me that is part of the fun of working stamp mixtures.

    When I go to stamp shows I always hit the dealers junk covers boxes. I have found many items that are of interest to me and fit into my collections, but nothing of great value. Most dealers are too sharp to leave anything of value in those boxes. The most valuable cover that I have found was a Philatelic Truck cover canceled in a smaller town, I think from Ohio. It cost 50c and I sold it on eBay for around $20.00

    Once in awhile I will go to an estate sale advertising collectibles. I have never found any philatelic treasures at them either. Although, I attended one, probably about ten years ago, on the last day of the sale. As usual, everything was priced half off on the last day. The deceased apparently was a stamp collector of sorts. He/she had subscribed to one of those commemorative cover offers that used to advertise in the Sunday papers and in some magazines. There were a couple of albums of those left over upon which I passed. With, them, however, were too full sheets of U.S. Sc. 1633-1652, the state flags issue of 1976 and Sc 1953-2002, the state birds issue of 1982 I don't remember the full price, but 1/2 of it was less than face value for the sheets. I bought them. Not a treasure, but at least a bargain. I intended to sell them on eBay, but never got around to it. They are in one of my boxes of miscellaneous stuff. Maybe the price for them is rising and they will be a treasure someday. :)

    Don
     
  16. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    HG:

    Yes, it is always entertaining to read of great finds, stamps, coins, art works, etc. They always leave me hopeful that, maybe, someday, I might make a great find too. For me that is part of the fun of working stamp mixtures.

    When I go to stamp shows I always hit the dealers junk covers boxes. I have found many items that are of interest to me and fit into my collections, but nothing of great value. Most dealers are too sharp to leave anything of value in those boxes. The most valuable cover that I have found was a Philatelic Truck cover canceled in a smaller town, I think from Ohio. It cost 50c and I sold it on eBay for around $20.00

    Once in awhile I will go to an estate sale advertising collectibles. I have never found any philatelic treasures at them either. Although, I attended one, probably about ten years ago, on the last day of the sale. As usual, everything was priced half off on the last day. The deceased apparently was a stamp collector of sorts. He/she had subscribed to one of those commemorative cover offers that used to advertise in the Sunday papers and in some magazines. There were a couple of albums of those left over upon which I passed. With, them, however, were too full sheets of U.S. Sc. 1633-1652, the state flags issue of 1976 and Sc 1953-2002, the state birds issue of 1982 I don't remember the full price, but 1/2 of it was less than face value for the sheets. I bought them. Not a treasure, but at least a bargain. I intended to sell them on eBay, but never got around to it. They are in one of my boxes of miscellaneous stuff. Maybe the price for them is rising and they will be a treasure someday. :)

    Don[/QUOTE]


    I have never seen anything worthwhile much less a bargain or a 'steal' at a garage sale or a flea market! Yet I've heard dozen's of stories about such finds. What am I doing wrong? :bored:

    I did find a treasure in chess books at a garage sale - a four volume set from 1895 in terrific shape. Got them for $10 and they fetch around $400 on the rare instance of seeing them on eBay.

    The Philatelic Truck is an interesting story/sideline. I have the book but not yet read. Guess I will now...and probably have to snatch a sheet and a postal card. I'll tell my wife I need to short her spending money this week because of <DonSellos>!;)
     
    DonSellos likes this.
  17. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    I have been tempted to buy this books several times, but haven't yet. I would like to read it as I find the Philatelic Truck an unusual experiment and one that illustrates the widespread appeal of stamp collecting in the 1930s and early 1940s. The souvenir sheets are a drug on the market, but the prices asked for them is amazingly varied. I guess there is a premium for the gummed version, but dealers seem out of sync in their pricing of both varieties.

    Don
     
  18. H. G. Golightly

    H. G. Golightly Active Member

    WOW! Looks like I sparked an interesting 'off-subject' to this original link
    'MOLOKAI'S BLOG'
    Perhaps there would be some interest from others in the StampExchange
    Group (Who did not get in on this post) to discuss Good to Great stamp deals found at places other than Stamp shows.
    I especially enjoyed the Molokai's mention of Herman 'Paddy' Herst's good fortune finding a 30c pictorial invert at an antique store as noted in his book 'Nassau Street'. (I think I'm going on my 5th read)..I highly recommend it to any stamp collector who has not read it.
    From a knight that sez 'NIEH',
    Harry G.
     
    Molokai likes this.
  19. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    A fun video on Stamp Collecting from 1955. Some nice shots of Nassau Street.

     
    DonSellos likes this.
  20. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    Great short! That is a film that we might have seen in a movie theater proceeding the main feature on a Saturday matinee. The perf gauge the woman used toward the end is the same as the one I have. An aluminum "Merit Gauge" made by Meghrig. I bought it at a stamp shop in Tucson, Az., and paid 50 cents for it.

    Don
     
    Molokai likes this.
Draft saved Draft deleted
Similar Threads: MOLOKAI’S BLOG
Forum Title Date
Stamp Chat Blog Jun 2, 2013

Share This Page