Let's See Some Sailing Ships/Boats

Discussion in 'Stamp Chat' started by Gunny, Mar 22, 2015.

  1. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    That was a nice prize! :D
     
  2. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello all, The Savannnah
    Date of issue: 1944-05-22
    upload_2015-11-9_11-55-50.png
    SS Savannah was an American hybrid sailing ship/sidewheel steamer built in 1818. She is notable for being the first steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean, a feat that was accomplished from May to June 1819, although only a fraction of the distance was covered with the ship under steam power. The rest was sailed by wind power. In spite of her historic voyage, Savannah was not a commercial success as a steamship and was converted back into a sailing ship shortly after returning from Europe. Savannah was wrecked off Long Island in 1821.

    Regards, James.
     
  3. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello all, The Frigate Constitution
    Date of issue: 1947-10-21
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    USS Constitution is a wooden-hulled, three-masted heavy frigate, named by President George Washington.
    Launched in 1797, Constitution was the third of the six original frigates mentioned in my earlier post. Designed by Joshua Humphreys for America's then young Navy as Capital Ships, and so Constitution and her sisters were larger and more heavily armed and built than standard frigates of the period. The Constitution was built in the North End of Boston, MA, at Edmund Hartt's shipyard. Constitution‍ 's hull was built 21 inches (530 mm) thick, the primary materials used in her construction consisted of pine and oak, including Southern Live Oak. Her first duties with the newly formed U.S. Navy were to provide protection for American merchant shipping during the Quasi-War with France and to defeat the Barbary Pirates in the First Barbary War.
    Constitution‍ 's launching ceremony on 20 September 1797 was attended by President John Adams and Massachusetts Governor Increase Sumner. Upon launch, she slid down the slipways only 27 feet (8.2 m) before stopping; her weight had caused the ways to settle into the ground, preventing further movement. An attempt two days later resulted in only an additional 31 feet (9.4 m) of travel before the ship again stopped. After a month of rebuilding the ways, Constitution finally slipped into Boston Harbor on 21 October 1797, with Captain James Sever breaking a bottle of Madeira wine on her bowsprit.

    Constitution is most famous for her actions during the War of 1812 against the British, when she captured numerous merchant ships and defeated five British warships in sea battles: HMS Guerriere, Java, Pictu, Cyane and Levant.

    A frigate, half the size of the USS Constitution was sighted on 19 August 1812 and subsequently, determined to be HMS Guerriere, Guerriere opened fire upon entering range of Constitution, doing little damage. After a few exchanges of cannon fire between the ships Captain Hull maneuvered into an advantageous position and brought Constitution to within 25 yards (23 m) of Guerriere. He then ordered a full double-loaded broadside of grape and round shot fired, which took out Guerriere‍ 's mizzenmast. With her mizzenmast dragging in the water, Guerriere‍ 's maneuverability decreased and she collided with Constitution; her bowsprit becoming entangled in Constitution‍ 's mizzen rigging. This left only Guerriere‍  's bow guns capable of effective fire. Hull's cabin caught fire from the shots, but the fire was quickly extinguished. With the ships locked together, both captains ordered boarding parties into action, but due to heavy seas neither party was able to board the opposing ship. At one point the two ships rotated together counter-clockwise, with Constitution continuing to fire broadsides. When the two ships pulled apart, the force of the bowsprit's extraction sent shock waves through Guerriere‍ 's rigging. Her foremast soon collapsed, and that brought the mainmast down shortly afterward. Guerriere was now a dismasted, unmanageable hulk, with close to a third of her crew wounded or killed, while Constitution remained largely intact. The British surrendered.
    Using his heavier broadsides and his ship's sailing ability, Hull had managed to surprise the British. Adding to their astonishment, many of their shots rebounded harmlessly off Constitution‍ 's hull. An American sailor reportedly exclaimed "Huzzah! her sides are made of iron!" and Constitution acquired the nickname "Old Ironsides"

    The battle left Guerriere so badly damaged that she was not worth towing to port. The next morning, after transferring the British prisoners onto the Constitution, Hull ordered Guerriere burned. Arriving back in Boston on 30 August, Hull and his crew found that news of their victory had spread fast, and they were hailed as heroes.

    The nickname of "Old Ironsides" and public adoration that has repeatedly saved her from scrapping. She continued to serve as flagship in the Mediterranean and African squadrons, and circled the world in the 1840s. During the American Civil War, she served as a training ship for the US Naval Academy. She carried US artwork and industrial displays to the Paris Exposition of 1878.
    .
    Retired from active service in 1881, Constitution served as a receiving ship until designated a museum ship in 1907. In 1934 she completed a three-year, 90-port tour of the nation. Constitution sailed under her own power for her 200th birthday in 1997, and again in August 2012, to commemorate the 200th anniversary of her victory over Guerriere.

    Regards, James.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2015
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  4. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    Great to know that such historical old ship can still be sailing in the modern times. They are great in preserving the Constitution. :)
     
  5. Gunny

    Gunny Retired Jarhead

    I haven't heard that before, but would doubt it very much.
     
  6. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    2015 Sailing ships sheet of Denmark.
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    source
     
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  7. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello, Just said in Jest, the scale of the ship on the map. English joke.

    James
     
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  8. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    A stamp from Cuba with a sailing ship circa 1965. :)
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    source
     
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  9. SATX Collector

    SATX Collector Remember the Alamo!

    Folks:

    I just GOTTA put this in... not stamp related but it does talk to sailing ships.

    James - one for your history books!!!

    ORIGIN OF COMMON QUOTES:
    **********************************
    Bet you didn't know this! In the heyday of sailing ships, all war ships and many freighters carried iron cannons. Those cannons fired round iron cannon balls. It was necessary to keep a good supply near the cannon. However, how to prevent them from rolling about the deck?

    The best storage method devised was a square-based pyramid with one ball on top, resting on four resting on nine, which rested on sixteen. Thus, a supply of 30 cannon balls could be stacked in a small area right next to the cannon. There was only one problem....how to prevent the bottom layer from sliding or rolling from under the others.

    The solution was a metal plate called a 'Monkey' with 16 round indentations. However, if this plate were made of iron, the iron balls would quickly rust to it. The solution to the rusting problem was to make 'Brass Monkeys.'

    Few landlubbers realize that brass contracts much more and much faster than iron when chilled.. Consequently, when the temperature dropped too far, the brass indentations would shrink so much that the iron cannonballs would come right off the monkey.

    Thus, it was quite literally, 'Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey.' (All this time, you thought that was an improper expression, didn't you.)
     
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  10. Gunny

    Gunny Retired Jarhead

    Awesome !!!!!!!!!!!
     
  11. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    I am not familiar with that saying or line but at least nice to learned something new. :D
     
  12. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello all,

    According to the United States Navy Historical Center, this is a legend of the sea without historical justification. The center has researched this because of the questions it gets and says the term “brass monkey” and a vulgar reference to the effect of cold on the monkey’s extremities, appears to have originated in the book “Before the Mast” by C.A. Abbey. It was said that it was so cold that it would “freeze the tail off a brass monkey.” The Navy says there is no evidence that the phrase had anything to do with ships or ships with cannon balls.

    Ship-board "Brass Monkeys" would be downright dangerous on a ship heeling over at maybe 30°. Cannon balls of metal, stone or canister-shot would only be put on deck when the "Clear for Action" was called and placed in wooden boxes and replenished as needed from below decks as would the gunpower charge bags.
    On shore based ordinance, cannon balls were stacked in pyramids, sometimes with a wooden frame around them.

    Regards, James.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
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  13. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    Artistic stamp of Bulgaria featuring a 15th century ship. :)
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    source
     
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  14. SATX Collector

    SATX Collector Remember the Alamo!

    Bulgaria is one of my collections but I don't recall this one... will have to look.
     
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  15. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    I think lots of Bulgarian stamps that you can still discover, happy looking. :)
     
  16. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    Classic 1921 Hanseatic trading ship.
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    source
     
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  17. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello Z, A beautiful stamp.
    James.
     
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  18. Hochstrasse

    Hochstrasse Well-Known Member

    I have a Danzig collection, really love this set Zee. Great post!
     
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  19. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    Good to know you have this set Hoch, really nice set for sure. :)
     
  20. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello all, my Sailing ship for today is a se-tenent pair issued for the 150th anniversary of South Australia. Date of issue: 1986-02-12

    upload_2016-1-29_19-1-11.png

    Regards, James.
     
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