Kansas and Nebraska overprints

Discussion in 'United States Stamps' started by kacyds, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    Why Were the Kansas-Nebraska Stamps Issued?
    During the 1920s, a rash of post office robberies baffled U.S. postal inspectors. Burglars were stealing stamps in one state and then selling them in another. As the Post Office Department searched for a solution to put an end to the problem, the robberies became more frequent and more widespread, especially in the Midwest.

    In February 1929, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing was authorized to apply special state overprints to the 1¢ through 10¢ denominations of the current regular issues, in an effort to put an end to the interstate sale of stolen postage stamps. Once the stamp had been produced, the name of the state where the stamps were to be used would be imprinted over the design. Such a move had been under consideration for some time, and it was hoped that the overprints would make it difficult to sell or use stamps from another state.

    Kansas and Nebraska were selected as trial states, since the postal inspector who had made the suggestion was in charge of inspections in these two states and would be supervising the experiment. The overprints were abbreviations of the states (Kans. and Nebr.) and were applied in the same manner as precancels. Each state received a small supply of stamps for each of its post offices.

    When the new Kansas/Nebraska overprints were released, the Post Office Department made the announcement that these stamps were valid as postage throughout the United States. However, these overprints were very similar to the current precancels, which were not valid for use outside the intended area. Numerous complaints were received because post offices in other states were not accepting the overprinted stamps as evidence of pre-payment.

    Because there were so few stamps and such a great demand for them, these issues became a prime target for counterfeiters. The most common forgeries were known as the “California Fakes,” since they were first discovered in San Francisco. Since the genuine overprints were printed using electrotype plates and the forgeries were done using a typewriter, the difference between the two is easy to distinguish. On a genuine overprint, the image was printed on the surface rather than impressed into the stamp. Thus, the ink lies flat on the surface and almost appears raised. Most importantly, if one turns the stamp over, the image doesn’t appear impressed, and it never breaks the gum.

    These are the stamps from my collection.

    View attachment 1809 View attachment 1810
     
  2. swish513

    swish513 Active Member

    thanks for the info. i had always wondered why they were issued.
     
  3. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    And to think if it would had worked, they were to produce them for all 48 states at that time. That would have been a nightmare to collect. :eek:
     
  4. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    Nice piece of history and nice pieces of stamps.
    Thanks for the share! :)
     
  5. steve logan

    steve logan Logie Bear

    very interesting, although i have not come across any yet myself, but do have places forb them in my album the same as you do

    steve
     
  6. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Say...That's really something isn't it? I like the writeup about them. I think I may have one or 2 lying around somewhere but I don't collect overprints of any kind. I may reconsider though. Thank you. I was actually looking for my "Molly Pitcher" overprints last evening but to no avail. I know I have them but I "put them up so I wouldn't lose them" :rolleyes: (I lost them...)
     
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  7. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    OK here i my Molly Pitcher overprint. I think these apply don't they? It's not the greatest looking specimen but I like it. It's America's first stab at a commemorative stamp.

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. steve logan

    steve logan Logie Bear

    who was Molly Pitcher lol
    nice stamp though
     
  9. swish513

    swish513 Active Member

    i thought the columbians were the first commem??? :confused:
     
  10. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Yes your right but this was just an experimental ditty as it were. A "cheap-skate" commemorative. Needless to say it didn't fly.
     
  11. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    Molly Pitcher and the Battle of Monmouth
    According to legend, Mary “Molly” Ludwig was the wife of an infantry sergeant. During the battle, she carried pitchers of water to the wounded soldiers, causing her to be nicknamed “Molly Pitcher.” When her husband was wounded during the conflict, Molly took his place at the canon and fought during the balance of the battle.

    In reality, Molly Pitcher was not a real person, and the Battle of Monmouth was not as legendary as the stamp’s promoters originally believed. The battle, which took place on June 28, 1778, began when American general Charles Lee received orders from General George Washington to attack British forces crossing New Jersey to get to New York. Reportedly, Lee disagreed with the plan and retreated. When General Washington discovered that Lee and his men had retreated and were being followed by the British, he was forced to take command. The ensuing battle was one of the war’s longest. As Washington prepared to resume the battle early the next morning, he discovered that the British had snuck away in the night, reaching New York a few days later.

    Lee was court-martialed, leaving New Jersey residents searching for a new hero. Many believed that hero to be Mary Ludwig Hays, although no evidence exists that she in fact manned the cannon.

    The Molly Pitcher story is more likely based on the true story of Margaret Corbin, who took her husband’s place at the canyon after he was killed at Fort Washington in Manhattan, New York, in November 1776.
     
  12. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    About the Columbian Series
    The 1893 Columbian Exposition stamp series was like nothing before it. The Columbians were the first U.S. commemorative stamps, and they created a worldwide phenomenon. Expertly engraved and generous in size, the Columbians are among the most sought-after of all U.S. stamps.

    An Instant Hit with Collectors
    At the time they were issued, the Columbian stamps were controversial. Collectors eagerly awaited the series, forming long lines to purchase the stamps. Yet many were frustrated by the price of owning the complete series, which equaled more than $2,030 in today’s unskilled labor wages. Some postal clerks refused to sell Columbian stamps because demand far exceeded supply.

    As a consequence, used Columbian stamps were selling for almost full face value in 1893 – even as mint stamps were officially on sale. The craze for Columbian stamps was even more pronounced in Europe, where collectors hounded American tourists and begged for stamps from their mail. A corner of Hamburg’s stock exchange was devoted to trafficking Columbian stamps. On August 11, 1893, the New York Times reported these transactions were conducted “as carefully as they handled the highest gilt-edged securities.”
     
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  13. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    I truly believe that the Columbian issues are THE most overrated stamps in the hobby. They are by no means rare or even hard to locate. In my humble opinion and I mean just that they are way- way- waaaaaaaay overpriced and I also firmly believe that dealers have been fleecing collectors since these came out. I don't even find them very attractive. The challenge is getting all the Exposition tickets and both Half Dollars which, again, in my opinion are much more appealing to ones eye than the stamps. OK I said all that but I still pine for the missing ones in my little collection... Darn them.
     
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  14. kacyds

    kacyds New Member

    Sending some your way tomorrow!!! lol
     
  15. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    :p
    good..
     
  16. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Hey do you think this is a fake? :cool:
    [​IMG]
     
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  17. steve logan

    steve logan Logie Bear

    LOL very funny, but on a more serious note if anyone has any Kans or Nebr spare i would be happy to trade/pay for them to go in my collection, as i have none.
     
  18. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    I apologize for the antics I just been staring at these for too long and needed a change. I been browsing the typical internet auctions for the Kansas and Nebraska over prints as I don't think I own any in my humble little collection either! I'll tell you what, if I win the one lot I'm bidding on there are doubles and I'll forfeit them to you that is, of course, if I win it. I think there is a few Hawaii in there too but I'll just give them away to you as I don't even want to start another "branch" of my collection.
     
  19. steve logan

    steve logan Logie Bear

    Jay, i was not having a go, i was saying i found it quite funny, even more so as a few conversations up they were talking about fakes being done with a typewriter lol, now we ave a pc, scanner and paint to do them with.

    but if you do have spares when you win i am defo have them ;)
     
  20. Tom D

    Tom D Well-Known Member

    Way to go Jay on the Molly Pitcher was here.
     
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