Horse carriages on stamps

Discussion in 'Stamp Chat' started by Makanudo, Aug 7, 2016.

  1. Makanudo

    Makanudo Moderator Moderator

    Poland 1980. Vehicles pulled by horses:

    1q.jpg
     
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  2. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello all, this one from Alderney in the Channel Islands.

    Date of issue: 1998-11-10
    upload_2016-10-28_7-39-17.png

    Regards, James.
     
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  3. Makanudo

    Makanudo Moderator Moderator

    James,

    Is there something Alderney is known for?
     
  4. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    An extract from - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alderney

    History


    Alderney shares its prehistory with the other islands in the Bailiwick of Guernsey, becoming an island in the Neolithic period as the waters of the Channel rose. Formerly rich in dolmens, like the other Channel Islands, Alderney with its heritage of megaliths has suffered through the large-scale military constructions of the 19th century and also by the Germans during the World War II occupation, who left the remains at Les Pourciaux unrecognisable as dolmens. A cist survives near Fort Tourgis, and Longis Common has remains of an Iron Age site. There are traces of Roman occupation including a fort, built in the late 300s, at 49°43′09″N 2°10′36″W above the island's only natural harbour.
    The etymology of the island's name is obscure. It is known in Latin as Riduna but as with the names of all the Channel Islands in the Roman period there is a degree of confusion. Riduna may be the original name of Tatihou, while Alderney is conjectured to be identified with Sarnia. Alderney/Aurigny is variously supposed to be a Germanic or Celtic name. It may be a corruption of Adreni or Alrene, which is probably derived from an Old Norse word meaning "island near the coast". Alternatively it may derive from three Norse elements: alda (swelling wave, roller), renna (strong current, race) and öy or -ey (island). Alderney may be mentioned in Paul the Deacon's Historia Langobardorum (I.6) as 'Evodia' in which he discussed a certain dangerous whirlpool. The name 'Evodia' may in turn originate from the seven 'Haemodae' of uncertain identification in Pliny's Natural History (IV 16 (30) or Pomponius Mela's Chronographia (III 6,54).
    Along with the other Channel Islands, Alderney was annexed by the Duchy of Normandy in 933. In 1042 William the Bastard, Duke of Normandy (later William the Conqueror, King of the English) granted Alderney to the Abbey of Mont Saint-Michel. In 1057 the bishop of Coutances took back control of the island.
    After 1204, when mainland Normandy was incorporated into the kingdom of France, Alderney remained loyal to the English monarch in his dignity of Duke of Normandy.
    Henry VIII of England undertook fortification works, but these ceased in 1554. Essex Castle perpetuates the name of the Earl of Essex, who purchased the governorship of Alderney in 1591. Prior to the Earl's execution for treason in 1601, he leased the island to William Chamberlain, and Alderney remained in the hands of the Chamberlain family until 1643. From 1612, a Judge was appointed to assist the Governor's administration of Alderney, along with the Jurats. The function of the Judge was similar to that of the Bailiffs of Guernsey and Jersey, and continued until 1949.
    During the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, Alderney was held by a Parliamentary garrison under Nicholas Ling, Lieutenant-Governor. Ling built Government House (now the Island Hall). The de Carterets of Jersey acquired the governorship, later passing it to Sir Edmund Andros of Guernsey, from whom the Guernsey family of Le Mesurier inherited it, thus establishing a hereditary line of governors that lasted until 1825.
    Henry Le Mesurier prospered through privateering, and moved the harbour from Longis to Braye, building a jetty there in 1736. Warehouses and dwellings were built at Braye, and the export of cattle generated wealth for the economy. The Court House was built in 1770 and a school in 1790. A Methodist chapel was constructed in 1790, following John Wesley's visit in 1787. A telegraph tower was constructed above La Foulère in 1811, enabling signals to be relayed visually to Le Mât in Sark and on to Guernsey – early warning of attack during the Napoleonic Wars was of strategic importance. With the end of those wars privateering was ended and smuggling suppressed, leading to economic difficulties.
    The last of the hereditary Governors, John Le Mesurier, resigned his patent to the Crown in 1825, and since then authority has been exercised by the States of Alderney, as amended by the constitutional settlement of 1948.

    Regards, James.
     
  5. Makanudo

    Makanudo Moderator Moderator

    Scott #1258 1978
    1.70K 1699 Coronation Coach.

    v.jpg
     
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  6. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello all, I wasn't sure which thread this fitted best, it is a steam powered horse drawn fire engine from my UK collection.

    Date of issue: 1974-04-24
    View attachment 3419

    Regards, James.
     
  7. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello all, I found a few Saar stamps on my old HHD.

    From 1947 to 1956 the Saarland was a French-occupied territory (the "Saar Protectorate") separate from the rest of Germany.

    upload_2016-12-19_8-23-29.png

    Regards, James.
     
  8. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello all, this depicts a Persian royal guard chariot overlaying a map of Iran. From the 7000 Years of Persian art series.

    Date of issue 1964-06-04
    upload_2017-1-9_6-50-4.png

    Regards, James.
     
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  9. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    Österreich 1713.jpg First Horse-Railway-Line,issued July 30th,1982
     
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  10. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello all, I would dispute that it was the first horse drawn passenger rail carriage (1832). Strictly speaking the stamp depicts a "Tramway", a horsedrawn single carriage. not a "Train" a series of linked carriages.

    The first tram services in the world were started by the Swansea and Mumbles Railway in Wales, using specially designed carriages on an existing tramline built for horse-drawn freight dandies. Fare-paying passengers were carried on a line between Oystermouth, Mumbles and Swansea Docks from 1807. The Gloucester and Cheltenham Tramroad (1809) carried passengers although its main purpose was freight.

    [​IMG]
    ____________________________________

    The first horse-drawn rail cars on the continent of Europe were operated from 1828 by the České Budějovice - Linz railway. Europe saw a proliferation of horsecar use for new tram services from the mid-1860s, with many towns building new networks.

    Regards, James.
     
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  11. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    Hallo James,
    it was the first in Austria,of course.
    And it was exactly the line you describe in the second part of
    your post.Ceske Budejovice seems to be the Czech (?) name
    for Budweis,as the city was named at the time and still is known
    today in Germany and is used by a beer-brand in the US.
    Well,wether it was established in 1832,as the stamp suggests,
    or in 1828,I don´t know.
    An "Eisenbahn" in German literally means a "way made of iron".
    Regardeless what kind of vehicles are used.
    The German for train is "Zug",what does not appear on the stamp.
     
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  12. Makanudo

    Makanudo Moderator Moderator

    Austria 1964, Postal history series:

    d2.jpg
     
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  13. Makanudo

    Makanudo Moderator Moderator

    Singapore stamp, 1997. Offset litography

    carr.jpg
     
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  14. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    Österreich 3000.jpg
    The Fiaker(s) are a major tourist attraction of Vienna.
    According to Wikipedia there were 144 Fiaker (in German the
    singular and the plural for Fiaker are alike) in service in 2008.
     
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  15. Makanudo

    Makanudo Moderator Moderator

    This is the word "fiaker", that was imported and used in our language from the deutch language.
    Only plural in serbian is fiakeri
     
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  16. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    According to Wikipedia Fiaker originates from the French Fiacre.
     
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  17. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    KutschenPak930.jpg
    A "Fiaker Sindh Style",issued May 22nd,1995
     
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  18. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    KutDK327.jpg
    Mail Transportation Coach,issued April 1st,1951
     
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  19. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    KutscheDK697.jpg
    Same type of coach,issued Feb.14th,1980
     
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  20. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    KutDK414.jpg
    issued May 27th,1963
     
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