Half and Quart Cents Stamps?

Discussion in 'United States Stamps' started by Randi, Mar 6, 2015.

  1. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    I was / am really into archaeology, probably because of the mudlarking back in the 50's. I have visited many hundreds of sites from within a few miles from my home to as far away as China including of course the classical sites in Italy, Greece, Egypt and Jordan. BTW I was refused entry to Israel that trip because I had an Egyptian visa entry in my passport - went on an unplanned trip to Jordan (Jerash and Petra) instead. In France I was lucky enough to visit the Lascaux caves (17,000 y/o paintings) before they were closed to the public in 1963.

    Regards, James
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2015
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  2. Gunny

    Gunny Retired Jarhead Moderator

    That is pretty awesome. I've seen a lot of historical sites stateside, but not that many outside the U.S. Pretty sad considering that I lived in Spain for 5 years, Japan for 5 years and 1.5 years on ships pulling port calls in different ports in the Med.
     
  3. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello, a Japan visit (Kyoto, Osaka and Kobe) is on my want list and not too far from here, two time zones. I'll have to save my pennies though, it's an expensive place to live.
    James
     
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  4. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello, I like the Reverse of the 1803 ½c coin, I like the fact that it also has ½00 ($) embossed too.
    A beautiful set of coins.
    Sometimes I regret having sold the bulk of my UK coins back in the 60's. C'est la vie.
    Regards James
     
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  5. SATX Collector

    SATX Collector Remember the Alamo!

    I took my Western Civ(ilization) courses for college when I was stationed in Germany (5-1/2 years). Where I was at was close enough to the city of Aalen, which was once part of the northernmost extant of the Roman Empire... we actually got to stand on the walls (Wikipedia for "Aalen" has a good picture). Many other field trips included the numerous castle ruins, museums, cathedrals, etc.

    Ditto on the archaeology... though I majored in Engineering, Math, and Science, I also minored in Social Sciences to include Archaeology, Sociology, & Behavioral Psychology (as applies to Group Psychology... used to be known as Organizational Psych), and almost had a 2nd major.

    The wife and I will be going over to Europe in 2017 to walk the paths of Martin Luther, and then to Greece and Italy to walk the Pauline histories.
     
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  6. CalzoneManiac

    CalzoneManiac Member

    I believe they began making stamps denominated in tenths of a cent around the 1970s.
     
  7. tasha

    tasha Active Member

    I had a few stamps with half cent on it and it took me back to the time where we could buy chewing gum for half a cent and a toffee for 1cent, wow now it costs 50cents for a gum and toffees are only sold in the big bags.
     
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  8. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello, Does any of our coin collectors have this Canadian Victory coin?
    May 8th 2015 was the 70th Anniversary of Victory in Europe Day.

    upload_2015-5-20_17-39-21.png
    Regards, James.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2015
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  9. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    Is that the first coin with Morse code ever?
     
  10. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello Z, I imagine that it is, I have not heard of another. I expect that someone may prove me incorrect.
    James
     
  11. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    Most probably, first time to read too about a coin with Morse code or any code. Very interesting.
     
  12. Hochstrasse

    Hochstrasse Moderator Moderator

    My collection is limited to U.S. coins, but I do have a jar of foreign coins accumulated by travel and other means. I'm pretty certain I don't have that coin, but it is quite nice. The Morse code makes it very unique.
     
  13. tasha

    tasha Active Member

    I didn't know that they would put morse code on a coin, you learn something new everyday. I love the shape of that coin it is unique.
     
  14. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello, getting close to my birthday again, I'll have to deduct another one to stay young;)
    Another British coin from my birth year. Commonly known as the "thrupenny bit"
    A three pence piece from the pre-decimal system. ¹/80 part of a pound.
    upload_2015-5-28_22-25-47.png
    Regards, James.
     
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  15. Gunny

    Gunny Retired Jarhead Moderator

    Are those flowers on the reverse?
     
  16. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello, yes, a bit of a pun really, they are called Thrift flowers. At the end of the war we had huge debts, mainly to the US for war supplies, ships, aircraft etc.
    Many of which were sunk by the "wolf-packs" before they even got to us.
    We were still on rationing until I think 1952? 1952 was when I saw and ate my first banana and orange.

    They had problems with the minting of the early coins because the dodecagon shape had sharp angles, this led to premature die failure, the design was modified to slightly more rounded angles to solve the problem.

    The reverse of this coin was later changed to the portcullis design.
    upload_2015-5-29_8-48-7.png
    I believe that the new 2017 £1 coin is going to be a similar shape.

    Regards, James.
     
  17. zararina

    zararina Simply Me! :D

    Very interesting coins and memories James. :)
    The thrift flowers and portcullis designs were both nice.
     
  18. tasha

    tasha Active Member

    I like the colour and the design of the coin sometimes the coins look discoloured and in South Africa our ones go green eventually which makes them look awful and the design has been the same for years and years. Hope you have a great birthday!!
     
  19. James-2489

    James-2489 Well-Known Member

    Hello Tasha, the reason Brass, Bronze and to some degree Gunmetal get the bluish-green patina is because of the copper content of these alloys, It usually takes many years to form. High humidity could accellerate the process. Churches with copper clad roofs when close to the sea tend to get the beautiful green colour more quickly due to the high salt content of the sea air. The patina is also called Verdigris, in drier climates this would be Copper Carbonate near the sea it would be Copper Chloride. The patina also inhibits further corrosion.

    Regards, James.

    PS thanks for the birthday greeting, we have three to celebrate, mine 26 June, granddaughter Khemsirah 3 July and my wife Nanthiya 4 July.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2015
  20. tasha

    tasha Active Member

    Pleasure, hope it was a good one and you are all so close birthday wise, means big celebrations then!!!
    Interesting info about the copper and the Patina, thank you.
     
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