Cover of the day

Discussion in 'Stamp Chat' started by DonSellos, May 17, 2016.

  1. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Another cover rising to the top of the write-up pile. This one between two venerable aircraft manufacturers, the Fairchild and Stinson aircraft corporations. Stinson is long gone, but Fairchild lingers on after a series of mergers.

    According to Wikipedia, the remnants of Fairchild Aircraft may be traced to Elbit Systems. Piper Aircraft was the last to acquire Stinson designs and the last identifiable Stinson design manufactured was the 1949 Piper-Stinson Station Wagon, a modification of Stinson's popular Voyager series with rear seating area converted to cargo space.

    This cover lacks philatelic value, but I like it for the inclusion of Fairchild's Pegasus corporate logo as a cachet. It is headed for my Commercial Advertising Covers album.

    Don

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  2. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Here is a first-day cover with commercial usage. The Journal American was a daily newspaper published in NYC between 1937 and 1966. I was attracted to this cover because it was addressed to a stamp dealer and apparently was sponsored by the newspaper's stamp collecting column, "The Stamp Review" (see the message to the right of the cachet).

    The stamp is Sc. 857, issued to commemorate the tercentenary of printing in colonial America, giving it relevance to the publishing of newspapers. The side message also notes that the cover contained a message, which I speculate called attention to the profitability of an ad on the page that "The Stamp Review" appeared. The addressee, Morsemare Stamp Shop in Palisades Park, N.J. was across the Hudson River from Manhattan. An example of this cover probably went to all NYC metro stamp dealers.

    I'm tempted to put this cover in my Stamp Publications or Stamp Dealers collections, but those categories are secondary to what it is, a first-day cover.

    Don

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  3. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Another first-day cover with commercial usage, this one from the Bell & Howell Company. The stamp, Sc. 1154, commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Pony Express. This is the second Pony Express stamp the U.S. Postal Service has issued, the other is Sc. 894 commemorating the service's 80th anniversary. A first-day cover of the earlier issue may be seen in my post #298 of Dec. 13, 2019, in Stamp Dealers Covers.

    As an aside, Bell & Howell represents, to me, cameras, microfilm & fiche readers, and slide & movie projectors, but note the second line of the return address, Phillipsburg Inserters. An internet search revealed that Phillipsburg Inserters is a division of B&H that specialized in machinery to facility producing envelopes, sealers, addressers, and stuffers for mailouts.

    Don

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  4. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Max Johl was an expert on twentieth-century U.S. postage stamps and co-author of the multi-volume U.S. Postage Stamps of the Twentieth Century. He also wrote a weekly column on U.S. stamps in Stamps Magazine. This cover looks like it might be a reply envelope for questions directed to him regarding his column. I seem to remember that the corner card is the same as the title illustration for his column in Stamps.

    Don

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  5. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    This cover, a recent acquisition, is an addition to my sideline collection of inaugural trips of named passenger trains. In this instance, the first trip of the "Man of War" running between Columbus and Atlanta, Georgia, on the Central of Georgia Railway. An added collecting point is the clearly struck Newnan & Columbus Railway Post Office cancel.

    DonSellos

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  6. Gunny

    Gunny Retired Jarhead Moderator

    This is where your postcard was originally sent to.

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  7. Gunny

    Gunny Retired Jarhead Moderator

    Elsie Hurdie lived in a pretty nice house.

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  8. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Hi Gunny:

    It's interesting to see the houses where collectors lived. I usually check addresses on Google Maps to see if the houses are still standing. I have been surprised to find that many collectors of the 1930s forward lived in rather modest dwellings, Elsie, above, excepted!

    DonSellos
     
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  9. Molokai

    Molokai Moderator Moderator

    Here is where Herman Herst lived. 229 West 70th Street. His mother, Lillian, lived a few blocks away.
     

    Attached Files:

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  10. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    About fifteen years ago I photocopied a List of the Century of Progress Cachets created for "special days' at the 1933 event. The list included the number of cacheted covers prepared for each day. Out of curiosity, I checked the list and found that two covers tied for the fewest prepared, Panama and Canal Zone Day with 1st Day annotation on July 1, 1933 and International Baby Chick Day on August 11, 1933, both at 50 each.

    When this Baby Chick Day appeared for sale on eBay, I bought it as a novelty. At only 50 covers prepared, it is probably my "rarest" cover, acquired at a whopping $3.50, and free shipping. I haven't counted the number of the other covers closely, but I estimate there were about 170 different issued for the 1933 event. Many with less than 100 for the day. They would make a challenging collection to complete. There is still an Iowa Farm Bureau day that I need for my Iowa collection. I was outbid on an example that appeared on eBay earlier this year. I would willing trade my Baby Chick cover for the Iowa one I missed.

    Don

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  11. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Well, I did what I said I wasn't going to do -- start a new collecting field, i.e., Porto-Server patriotic covers printed in Chicago during the war years. I don't know how many different designs there are, but I would guess at least a dozen, minimum. I have seen them on the smaller #6 envelopes, but most for sale appear to be the larger #10s. I also don't know when they first appeared on the market, but this one has a 1942 copyright imprint on the reverse. The cachets include the big three of the military services, Army, Air Corps, and Navy personnel in a variety of actions and roles in a cartoon genre. So far, I have not seen one for the Coast Guard. Those that I have seen have a "mail for servicemen" theme. This one has a clear machine slogan cancel, but like many personal covers of the period, was roughly opened. This cover was also creased.

    Dos anyone else collect these?

    Don

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  12. Gunny

    Gunny Retired Jarhead Moderator

    009 Kenilworth NJ 15 Sept 1943.jpg With the U.S. election happening tomorrow, I thought I'd dig out this little nugget. It actually had the sample ballot inside.
     
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  13. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Not much philatelic value to this cover from the British Philatelic Bureau and it has languished in shoe box storage for the past 18 years. It is addressed to me, so I must have purchased something from the Bureau, but I cannot for the life of me remember what it was. It is an attractive cover franked with a complete set of stamps commemorating Elizabeth II's accession to the throne, Sc. 1436-1440, along with a photo cachet of the Royal Family and neatly postmarked at Edinburgh, Scotland. I am not surprised I kept it all these years. It is time I got it in my album.

    Don

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  14. RichardBabcock

    RichardBabcock Well-Known Member

  15. RichardBabcock

    RichardBabcock Well-Known Member

    IMG_20201102_0005.jpg Late use of these pair of Scott 300b Booklet pane. Broken or worn plate just under the 2s of the pair.
     
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  16. RichardBabcock

    RichardBabcock Well-Known Member

    IMG_20201102_0006.jpg Compare these two Scott 300b From Harvard, with the other pair.
     
  17. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    This is a first-day cover on commercial advertising stationery. My guess is the addressee had visited Pick's and picked up one of its envelopes and then used it to get the first day cancel. The stamp is Sc. 908, commemorating the last reunion of Confederate States veterans of the U.S. Civil War.

    In addition to the colorful and attractive cachet, Pick's Club Madrid had an interesting background. The club dates back to the 1920s and the Prohibition Era. It was owned and operated by brothers Sam and Ed Pick of Chicago. It became famous for its cuisine, its entertainment, and the availability of alcoholic beverages. Pick's remained in business until the spring of 1951 when it was destroyed by fire. Here is an internet image of Pick's and a link for more details about its history.

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    https://www.geocaching.com/geocache/GC44JZ7_club-madrid

    And the cover:

    b299.jpg

    DonSellos
     
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  18. Hochstrasse

    Hochstrasse Moderator Moderator

    Here's a card I obtained a number of years back. It's one that I bought on a whim, but very happy now that I bought it. It's a flown Zeppelin postal card from Danzig in 1932 with a partial set of the 1924 Landscape issues. I have been collecting German Areas for quite some time and Danzig was of special interest to me. DSC00007.JPG
     
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  19. Werner Salentin

    Werner Salentin Well-Known Member

    If I can see the photo (?) correctly,the stamps on the card are the
    complete Luposta overprint-set of 1932.
     
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  20. Hochstrasse

    Hochstrasse Moderator Moderator

    Yes Werner, you are correct! I had the two sets mixed up in my mind and didn't bother to check when I posted. Thanks for the correction. Yes it is a photo.
     
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