Aircraft on Covers

Discussion in 'Stamp Chat' started by DonSellos, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. Molokai

    Molokai Moderator Moderator

    Thanks!

    I was fascinated by the little gas engines and had quite a few. My uncle gave me several of the very old spark ignition ones. I still have a couple of those as well as a McCoy RedHead and a Cox PeeWee. Lotsa fun! I also have a Cox race car, red one with the engine mounted on the back.
     
    DonSellos likes this.
  2. anglobob

    anglobob Moderator Moderator

    Received this today...one of my favourite French airmail stamps,issued in 2000.
    Denomination in both francs and euros.
    Image (349).jpg
     
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  3. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    A nice cover, Bob, with a classic airplane on that stamp. Also known as Arc-en-Ciel, the Couzinet aircraft was first flown in 1928, and with subsequent design improvements, became the Couzinet 71 and entered regular trans-Atlantic service in 1934. Enormous wheel fairings on that airplane! Here is an internet photo of the whole airplane.

    Don

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    This cover, a recent acquisition, has three collecting points for me: 1st. it is a first-day cover for Sc. 31, the 50 cents high value airmail stamp from the transport planes set issued between 1941 and 1944. The St. Louis cancellation is a premium cancel site for this stamp. 2nd, it was postmarked at the third, and last, annual World-Wide Philatelic Convention held in St. Louis in 1941. The first was held in Tulsa in 1939 and the second at Detroit, 1940, and 3rd, the cover includes a recognizable drawing of the iconic Douglas DC-3 in the cachet. It is for the DC-3 drawing that I collected the cover.

    Don

    b350.jpg
     
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  5. BettyBoop

    BettyBoop Active Member

    Hi all, some fabulous Aircraft covers here.
    I thought you might be interested in the story behind the attached cover from 2010 in Australia.
    I wrote this small article for my local Stamp Club
    "Under the heading of “Did you know? “ comes this story of the famous magician and escapologist Harry Houdini, who visited the little town of Diggers Rest just outside of Melbourne, over 100 years ago.

    To quote The Age in 2010, there were only a handful of people watching as Houdini flew a fragile box kite, with wooden struts and cloth panels framing a tiny engine for three minutes and 30 seconds.

    It reached a height of 100 feet (30.4 metres) and was the first powered controlled flight in Australia in 1910.

    100 years later the town of Diggers Rest had a 3-day celebration of this achievement, with a re-enactment and much partying, joy flights etc.

    Houdini had been touring with his famous magic act (at £1,000 per week) and the idea of being a pioneer aviator appealed to him. He brought to Australia a Voisin Biplane he had bought in France, and had flown in Hamburg, Germany. He camped for a month with a couple of aviators on a farm near Diggers Rest before the attempt, which nearly ended in a gum tree, diverting over it in time.

    Always one for publicity, Houdini invited a film cameraman, press photographers and officials from the Aerial League of Australia to witness the event.

    Australia Post produced three stamps in 2010 commemorating the centenary of the occasion."
    cheers
    BettyBoop
     

    Attached Files:

  6. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Great story, Betty. I didn't know that Houdini was also a pilot.

    Don
     
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