Aircraft on Covers

Discussion in 'Stamp Chat' started by DonSellos, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    I am guessing that may be one of your larger collections? Amazing how many different types of aircraft.
     
  2. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    Hi Molokai:

    Yes, Aircraft on Covers is one of my larger collections. I have two albums of covers written up and on pages, but probably double that number that are still in a shoe box awaiting write-up. I find writing up covers, aircraft or otherwise, a little tedious, but believe it is necessary. For me, page after page of covers with no write up become a little boring also. When looking at others' collections, I like to know what it is about a cachet, franking, post mark, receiving cancels, postal markings, the sender, or the addressee that makes the cover special and collectable.

    Yes, also to the different aircraft in the world. I don't know how many, but I regularly use two "encyclopedias" of aircraft for identification of those depicted on stamps and covers. The encyclopedias number nearly one thousand pages with photos and descriptions of the world's aircraft. Fortunately, they are arranged alphabetically by manufacturer and indexed by model designation. Stanley-Gibbons has also published a catalog of Aircraft on stamps that is very helpful. I usually don't collect a stamp or a cover if the aircraft on it is not identifiable. Doing the identification adds to the time it takes for write-up.

    I am guessing, but it seems there are about 100 different aircraft that appear over and over on world-wide stamps and covers and most of those are identified on those stamps and covers. That makes the process easier, but I do enjoy occasionally finding an airplane that is rarely used on stamps and covers.

    Undoubtedly, more answer than you wanted. Two "yeses" would have sufficed.:yawn:

    Don
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2019
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  3. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    This cover/postal card could go in more than one of my albums, cinderellas, postal stationery, first-day covers, aircraft on stamps and on covers. I collected it for the cinderella that is tied to the card. The Grumman "Avenger" may appear at first glance as a fighter or pursuit aircraft, but it was a torpedo bomber and a much larger airplane with a crew of three, pilot, gunner, and a radio operator. President George H.W. Bush was, perhaps, the most famous Avenger pilot. He flew 58 combat missions in 1944. His aircraft was shot down by enemy ground fire on the last mission Sept. 2, 1944. Bush was successfully rescued by a U.S. Navy submarine, but his gunner and radio operator were killed.

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  4. Molokai

    Molokai Well-Known Member

    Not at all! I appreciate your taking time to fill me in on this topic. It may not exactly be 'up my alley' but I always enjoy learning. I do collect the U.S. C11 and purchased a set of Liechtenstein airmails when <JAMES> showed his sometime back. They were too pretty to pass up.

    You are so correct about the write-up. Pages with nothing but stamps can actually get some boring. Your write ups are always entertaining and instructive.

    And, of course, there is that Ezra Cole Zepp cover I've been waiting four years for you or <HOCH> to pick up for me.:rolleyes:

    It sounds like you still have quite a few show boxes. I feel better knowing that you do. :smug:
     
  5. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    The real photo cachet on this contemporary cover depicts a Geoffry de Havilland design known as a D.H.4 produced by the Aircraft Manufacturing Company, (Airco) in 1917 as a single engine bomber. It was widely produced and widely used by the Allies during the latter years of WW I and then surplused to other countries after the war for military and civilian service. In the U.S. it was used on contract airmail routes and is pictured on four early U.S. airmail stamps, Sc. C6, the .24 carmine airmail of 1923 and Sc. C7-C9, the airmail "map" stamps of 1928.

    Don

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  6. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    This is actually a commercial cover out of Ecuador, but I collected it for the image of the Junkers Ju 52/3m. Junker aircraft were popular with the South American national airlines during the 1930s. Unfortunately, the postmark is not clear enough to read the date of posting of this cover. The stamps, however, date from the 1930s, the latest issued being the 2 sucres NY World's Fair issue of 1939. No receiving cancel on the reverse. My guess is the cover was posted late 1939.

    Don

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  7. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    This item is one of those infrequently seen covers with multiple collecting points. First, it a first flight cover on CAM 32, second, it is an association cover addressed to George Linn, editor of Linns Stamp News, third, it has a near perfectly centered bullseye biplane cancellation, fourth, there is a nice drawing of what appears to be a Boeing Model 40A or B in the cachet, fifth, it is a stamp dealer's cover prepared by Myron. F. McCamley, proprietor of the Multnomah Stamp Company of Portland, Oregon, and, sixth, there is the super, colorful Boeing System label on the reverse with its image of a Boeing Model 80.

    Of the collecting points, the least of my interests is the first flight cover. It is difficult to choose, however, which of the points is my favorite and where in my collections I should mount this cover. I am leaning toward placing it in my association cover collection as it is is addressed to George Linn and the address being the first thing most people see when looking at the cover. Cross references to the other points can go in the write-up and I'll include a scan of the reverse as well. I have not seen a cover from McCamley's Multnomah Stamp Company, but he has entries in both the 1935 and 1938 editions of the Blue Book of Philately, identifying him as a collector/dealer and active in a number of philatelic organizations, interested in covers and the author of cover-related columns in philatelic publications and the Portland Oregonian. Maybe he was hoping for a little free advertising by sending this cover to George Linn!

    Don

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  8. anglobob

    anglobob Well-Known Member

    Don....I like the reverse side...nice label
     
  9. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    An amazing aircraft, the Concord, and its Russian counterpart, the Tupolev TU-144. The Concord was a popular topic on stamps during the 1970s-1980s but is seen less frequently on new issues of the 21st century. I especially like the clear cancels on this aerogram.

    Don

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    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
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  10. DonSellos

    DonSellos Well-Known Member

    From the Boeing Corporation's employees stamp club comes this cover with its depiction of the Boeing 221A. It began service with United Airlines in 1931 on the Cheyenne, Wyoming -- Chicago, Illinois, leg of the San Francisco -- Chicago route. The airplane carried 8 passengers in a cabin in front of the pilot who remained exposed to the elements. Sitting directly behind that big radial engine must have been a noisy ride for the passengers, and a noisy, cold ride for the pilot! This model began as the 220, which was designed for mail transport, the model 221 had a stretched fuselage to accommodate 6 passengers, but less mail, and the 221A was longer still and had room for 8 passengers. The cover came with an info card outlining the development of the airplane and a three-view drawing.

    Don

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