Aircraft on Covers

Discussion in 'Stamp Chat' started by DonSellos, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Here is another TWA-related cover, also with a drawing of the Douglas DC-3, the premier aircraft of the airlines in the late 1930s. This is also a National Airmail Week cover from Columbus, Ohio. A third collecting point for this cover is its association value. It is addressed to Pres. Roosevelt. During air mail week, postmasters were encouraged to send an example of their town's cachet to the president and to Postmaster General James Farley. A cover addressed to Farley is also shown below. These are examples of such covers. The Columbus, Ohio, cover is from Asst. Postmaster Madison Cooper, who was probably hoping to be postmaster. Postmasters were political appointees at that time. The card from the Philadelphia post office has a printed message on the reverse congratulating Farley on his successful promotion of Air Mail Week and is signed by one of the office's clerks. It is collected for its image of a Curtiss JN Jenny in the cachet. Jennys were used for the first official air mail flight and on the early airmail routes. Both of these covers are franked with Sc. C-23 first issued on May 14th, 1938, especially for use on Air Mail Week covers. The stamp was purportedly designed from a sketch drawn by Pres. Roosevelt.

    One wonders if these covers were ever seen by their addressees and, if so, how did they get out and into an eBay auction. In the case of the Pres. Roosevelt cover there is no marking on the back indicating that it was part of the sale of his collection.

    Don

    The DC -3 cover addressed to the president:
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    The Curtiss Jenny card addressed to the postmaster general:
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  2. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    This Richmond, Virginia, National Air Mail Week cover is collected less for its aircraft in the cachet and on cover, but for its addressee and accompanying letter from Virginia's state chairman for NAMW. My impression is that state chairmen were mostly postmasters from a large post office in the state, or occasionally state politicians. This letter is on special NAMW stationery making it a nice collateral item

    Don

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  3. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    National Air Mail Week inspired the sending of this cover. It contains a newsy letter sent to a relative or close friend. NAMW covers are a rich source for aircraft on covers and I have collected this one for its cachet showing a photograph of an early, home built aircraft that probably will never be shown on another cover or a stamp. It is also unusual because of the small circular handstamp on the left top. That looks like cover collector's stamp occasionally seen on 1930s covers. It is doubly unusual as the sender is a woman. Not many women cover collectors in the 1930s, especially on the plains of Kansas.

    Don
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  4. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Here is a WW II patriotic cover depicting a slightly stylized Curtiss P-40 Warhawk, an aircraft that was used on several fronts during the early years of the war. It fits into two collecting categories for me, first, as described on this page, Aircraft on Covers, but secondly, it also fits into my smaller 'Keep 'em Flying" slogan collection. Patriotic Covers were very popular during WW II and widely used, by both collectors and non-collectors.

    Don

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    Last edited: Jun 10, 2018
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  5. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Another patriotic with a stylized drawing of Grumman F2Fs as a cachet.

    Don
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  6. anglobob

    anglobob Moderator Moderator

    Don....
    Maybe I am a hopeless old romantic...I feel quite sad when I read about collections being broken down and ending up on various auction sites.At least in this case ,the cover ended up in good hands !!
    Bob
     
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  7. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Bob:

    My guess is that most of Margaret Weston's patriotic covers ended up in other collectors albums. I haven't seen any of her covers listed on eBay for a long time now. However, I don't search eBay as diligently as I used to. There was another woman patriotic cover collector whose collection appeared on eBay. I'll post one of her covers tomorrow. Patriotics is really a wide field and I have the impression there are still collectors seeking this genre of covers. Some of the cachets are clever, well drawn, patriotic and humorous. Others are denigrating, crude, and border on racist, but I'm sure they didn't seem so at the time.

    Don
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2018
  8. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Here is the a cover addressed to the other woman collector mentioned above. More Curtiss P-40 Warhawks.

    Don
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  9. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    It has been awhile since I've posted to this thread so here is a cover I just dug out of my aircraft on covers shoe box. I don't remember where I bought this cover, but it looks like one that came out of a dealer's bargain box. It is nicely illustrated, but a little oversized and many collectors don't even like business-sized envelope, let alone oversized ones. Consequently, a bargain item.

    The cover depicts a Curtiss J-4 Jenny in the upper left corner, but the focus is the Consolidated B-24 Liberator. Consolidated Aircraft designed the B-24 in 1939 as a competitor with Boeing's iconic B-17, and, indeed, the B-24 emerged as a highly successful design, of which more than 18,000 were built for the U.S. Army Air Force and the RAF during WW II. The B-24 served in both the Pacific and European theaters, but it is, perhaps, most remembered as the aircraft that made the raid on the Ploesti, Romania, oil refineries in 1943.

    The cover apparently commemorates the acquisition and delivery of a specific B-24J to the Tucson Air Museum. It looks like the museum prepared this cover as a philatelic souvenir. Even though I was living in Tucson in 1969 (the date this cover was posted), I have never been to the museum. Something to put on the list for our next visit to Tucson. All in all, an attractive cover and welcome addition to my Aircraft on Covers collection.

    Don

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  10. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    The collector-made cover below is one of my favorites. It is solely of philatelic origin. The airplane looks like a Naval Aircraft Factory PH-3. A number of PH-3s were assigned to the Coast Guard and the aircraft pictured has Coast Guard markings. The image was apparently cut from an aviation magazine and pasted on a standard #6 envelope. The cover was posted in Riverside, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. The postmark is not clear enough to determine the day and year it was mailed, but probably in December 1943. The month and year are based upon a faint Dec 1943 in the postmark dial and the 1943 Christmas seal used on the cover. The addressee, John F. Vickery, is listed in the 1938 BLUE BOOK OF PHILATELY as a stamp dealer. He, PERHAPS, made this cover for his collection.

    Don

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  11. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Here are three images of WW II service specific stationery used by service men and women. I have collected the covers for their images of the Boeing B-17s. Both of the covers used the "free" ground transportation mailing option for those on active duty. If the mailer wanted airmail, he/she had to pay the airmail rate. The second cover also includes a popular label indicating the letter is from a service member. The third piece is an unused letterhead that came with the second cover. Both covers are from the same person, but mailed at different locales. They apparently were part of the addressee's collection of WW II patriotic covers.

    Don

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  12. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Sponsored by a local Kiwanis club, this cover commemorates the first anniversary of the end of WW II in Europe. The cachet includes a drawing of the Douglas DC-4 (Skymaster C-54 military version), the premier cargo aircraft of WW II. Given the large number of aircraft that could have been chosen for this cachet, it is ironic that the C-54 was selected to commemorate the event because it is the airplane that played the key role in breaking the Russian blockade of Berlin in 1949. After WW II, U.S. airlines used DC-4s until the better performing DC-6s and Lockheed Constellations made them obsolete.

    Don

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  13. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    The small photograph in the lower left corner of this first day cover is a Boeing 307 Stratoliner. A 1930s design that entered airline service in 1938 with TWA and Pan American, the Stratoliner was a "break through" aircraft. It carried only 33 passengers, not many by today's standards, but the aircraft had a pressurized cabin and could fly above much of the weather that grounded other airliners. It was also the first commercial airliner to include a flight engineer in its crew. Only eight Stratoliners entered airline service and no additional aircraft were built after WW II as other designs had been developed that carried more passengers at greater speeds and less costs. The cover is franked with Sc. C26, a stamp from the 1941-1944 airmail set of seven of the same design. The 8c stamp replaced the ubiquitous 6c stamp that had paid the one-ounce airmail rate in effect since July 1, 1934. The cachet is of the type developed by Walter Crosby. This may be one of his covers.

    Don

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  14. I will try and post some pics of some uk covers flown by the RAF. But at the moment the wife has had a tidy up and put then somewhere
     
  15. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Good luck on finding those, David. Happens to us all. I'm still looking for some hand illustrated covers that went missing several years ago.

    Don
     
  16. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Out of my Aircraft on Covers album is this PanAm commercial cover. Decent images of a Boeing 337 Stratocruiser on the front and a Douglas DC 7C, one of the last piston-powered airliners, on the reverse. The Stratocruiser entered airline service in 1947 and remained in use until 1958. The DC-7C entered non-stop trans-Atlantic service with PanAm in 1956. An added collection point for this cover is the cartoon-like cachet and illustration on the reverse.

    Don

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  17. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    I purchased this patriotic cover on eBay from a collector in Israel It is a somewhat different patriotic in that it features a British aircraft bombing what is presumably a German submarine. Most U.S. patriotics feature U.S. aircraft. The aircraft is a Vickers Wellington, a bomber dating back to the mid-1930s, but used throughout WW II. The December 7th postmark commemorates the third anniversary of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and America's entry into WW II.

    Don

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  18. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    A WW II patriotic cover with all the usual markings and featuring another iconic airplane of the period, the Lockheed P-38, Lighting. The P-38 was one of the most versatile aircraft deployed in WW II. It was used as a fighter with long-range bomber escort capabilities, as a reconnaissance aircraft, and as a low-level attack aircraft. It had good speed capable exceeding 400 mph and cruising at 290 mph. It was unusual in that its twin engines had counter rotating props, was one of the first combat aircraft to have self-sealing fuel tanks, and was the only U.S. fighter aircraft to be in production before and at the end of WW II. It was in service in both the Pacific and European theaters. Some 9,900 P-38 were delivered to the U.S. Army Air Force. It also was a P-38 aircraft that intercepted and shot down the Japanese bomber carrying Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto on April 18, 1943 over Bougainville in the Solomon Islands.

    Don

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    Last edited: Jan 13, 2019
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  19. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    Many consider the Chance-Vaught F4U Corsair as the best land and carrier based aircraft to serve in Pacific Theater during WW II. It entered service in 1943 and continued into the Korean War period. During the Korean War it was used primarily as a close ground support aircraft. This hand-painted cover shows two Corsairs low over a coastal area, presumably, the Korean coast. The cover was postmarked aboard the USS Hornet in 1954. Hornet entered active service in 1943 and served until 1947. The Navy brought it back into active service in 1953, but it did not participate in the Korean conflict. Given that the ship did not serve in the Korean War, I think this cachet is an add-on, although the cancel looks like it is laid over the painting of the sky. My guess is the artist painted the cover not realizing the ship was not in Korean waters during the conflict.

    Don

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  20. DonSellos

    DonSellos Moderator Moderator

    An undated photograph of Boeing B-29s lined up at the old Glen Martin bomber plant in Omaha, Nebraska, form the cachet on this cover. B-29s were produced in Renton, Washington, Wichita, Kansas, Marietta, Georgia, and Omaha, Nebraska, during WW II. The B-29, designated Superfortress, had a pressurized cabin for its crew and was capable of long-distance bombing runs. It entered service in 1943 and was able to attack the Japanese mainland from bases in India and China. After the capture of Saipan, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa, B-29 squadrons flew their missions from bases on these islands. Judging by the stamps used, this cover is philatelic in nature. The cancel is weak, but it appears to have been mailed in Reno, Nevada, in 2001. I bought the cover for $1.00 at the 2013 Grapevine, Texas, stamp show for my Aircraft on Covers collection.

    Don

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    Last edited: Jan 26, 2019
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